Veteran meat brand registers 70% revenue increase amid Covid-19 after going vegan

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Noble Jerky, a former meat company that switched to a vegan offering three years ago, saw its revenue rise by 70% amid the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020.

A 50-year-old meat company, Noble Jerky has seen an increase in revenue by 70% amid the Covid-19 pandemic after shifting to a fully vegan model.

Owned by the Urbani family, the brand went plant-based three years ago to switch to a more sustainable business model. Noble Jerky’s vegan jerky is an alternative to slowly marinated dried beef jerky, which was founded to combat the growing inefficiencies of the current food system.

After shifting away from animal-based food, Noble Jerky has garnered a strong following in the vegan market, and closed the year 2020 with a 70% year-on-year increase in revenue. The brand produces the plant-based jerky alternative in five flavours: Original, Chipotle, Sweet BBQ, Teriyaki and Sticky Hickory.

Compared to regular beef, which is noted as the most unsustainable food product, it uses much less water and land, and produces a fraction of the carbon emissions. All products are non-GMO and provide up to 14g of plant-based protein per serving.

Stefan Urbani, co-founder of NOBLE Jerky, said: “After we understood that sustainable agriculture was not feasible when raising animals for food production, we took our three generations of meat drying technical knowledge, along with new developments in plant-based proteins, to deliver people the ultimate sustainable plant-based protein that tastes just like a top-quality beef-jerky, with the hopes that we slowly reduce our meat dependency, and raise awareness on the health benefits of plant-based diets and products.”

She added: “Today, clients everywhere can purchase our novel products directly via our site and feel truly excited about relentlessly providing individuals with healthy vegan options and helping them see that a plant-based diet doesn’t have to be difficult.”

Anay Mridul
Anay is the managing editor of The Vegan Review. A journalism graduate from City, University of London, he was a barista for three years, and never shuts up about coffee. He's passionate about coffee, plant-based milk, cooking, eating, veganism, writing about all that, profiling people, and the Oxford Comma. Originally from India, he went vegan in 2020, after attempting (and failing) Veganuary. He believes being environmentally conscious is a basic responsibility, and veganism is the best thing you can do to battle climate change. He gets lost at Whole Foods sometimes.